Anime Review: Boku Dake ga Inai Machi Episode 4

satoru_mother.jpg

Things seem to still be progressing quite nicely, huh?

Earlier in the month, I found out that a series that I really enjoyed got an anime adaptation and having been following it regularly for a while now.

Today, I will be reviewing the next episode, which is Boku Dake ga Inai Machi episode 4.

As I have given a series synopsis in an earlier post, I will not go over it again.

hinadzuki_desk.jpg

Satoru and Hinadzuki's birthday is fast approaching, as well as the day the case from 18 years ago begins, and Satoru thinks that he is making some headway in changing the past.

However, after the party celebrating Hinadzuki and Satoru's birthday, Satoru finds out that things are not going the way he thought they would.

hinadzuki_smile.jpg

I really enjoyed this episode.

Even though Satoru did not end up back in 2006, like I thought he would in my review of the previous episode, I was still interested in everything that was going on and learning about the events from 18 years before the series started.

Besides, if more than one episode ended with Satoru being in a different time period, especially within the first third of the show, since the series page on My Anime List says that this series will only have twelve episodes, the time jumps just would not be that interesting.

I also liked how both Satoru and Hinadzuki got embarrassed during the course of this episode.

Throughout the series so far, the relationship between the two seemed to go at a good enough pace that many people would think that they would get married, once the future that is 2006 was changed, though I already know who Hinadzuki ends up with once Satoru finally does change the future.

In this episode, this possibility in one or both of them having a romantic interest in the other is played upon because the boys in Satoru's class keep on teasing him and Hinadzuki seems to blush when Satoru either compliments her or takes her hand.

Seeing all this go down, I was somewhat laughing quite a bit, though not as much as I was when I watched D-Frag! And Baka & Test, because Satoru, despite having the mind of somebody in their late twenties, gets embarrassed and does not know why he is embarrassed and children do not usually seem to have that kind of interest in other, unless that kid is the man eater from Detective Conan (Case Closed) episodes 61-62 (Japanese count).

This is what I expect from a relationship between children, and as A-1 Pictures did a much better job at it than FUNimation with their dub of Detective Conan, I have to give A-1 Pictures some props.

After all, children as young as Satoru and Hinadzuki are in the current time period of the series should not really know or even be comfortable with the things that adults and/or teenagers are stereotypically said to do in serious relationships.

Another thing that was quite nice was that Satoru's mother comes to his friend's rescue when he talked with Hinadzuki's mother and Hinadzuki herself about going somewhere on the weekend.

When Satoru said he wanted to go somewhere with Hinadzuki and the rest of his friends, Hinadzuki's mother was refusing to let her go and made an attempt to strike Satoru, only to be stopped by Satoru's mother.

This is how I expect a parent, or even elder sibling, to act when their child is doing something good or that they want to do for a friend and the child's friend is about to be treated improperly, and seeing her do this actually made me feel happy.

Of course, Satoru is at an age where people do not really care who comes to his or a friend's rescue, whereas if he were back in the present, he would probably be mocked for not doing anything more.

Still, I was pretty happy to see her come save her child, because if she had not, I would have been very disappointed, since she has been shown to care very much for her son, even up until the point where she is killed.

The thing that really caught my interest and surprised me though was how Satoru failed to bring about the outcome that he desired.

Now, I was kind of expecting this to happen, mainly due to how far I am in the manga, but I could not really feel surprised or sorry for Satoru when I read through these events in the manga.

Here, however, I have gotten the same kinds of feelings about the situations Satoru was going through for pretty much most of the episodes that have aired already.

The last time I could feel everything that I was going on at the moment that I was watching the show was when I was watching A Certain Scientific Railgun S during its run in Japan.

This is what people want to see and experience in any form of entertainment, and A-1 Pictures is really delivering on this one and makes me want to see the next episode right now.

Unfortunately, not all of their titles are as good as this one, especially since a few of their titles, such as Sword Art Online, are also hated as much as DBZ these days, but that could definitely change if A-1 Pictures has the right staff handling the series.

Outside of those things, I cannot really think of anything else that I particularly liked.

The fact that things are still interesting after going through a third of the series and that I was just as surprised as Satoru at the fact that Hinadzuki was missing, as well as the fact that Satoru's mother came to his rescue, made this a fairly enjoyable episode.

akemi_hinadzuki.jpg

Although I did like the episode, there are some issues.

However, nothing really seemed to bug me too much, if at all.

Because of this fact, I will have to say that there is nothing worth mentioning.

Considering that the series is still being handled quite well, with more to like than dislike, this was definitely worth watching.

I recommend this to everyone, even those that want to try something different.

What are your thoughts on Boku Dake ga Inai Machi episode 4? Did you like or hate it? Was there something that you liked or hated that went unmentioned? Feel free to comment.

Use an app on your phone (e.g. Scan for Android) to capture the image above. If successful, you should be taken to the web version of this article.

Copyright © 2015 Bryce Campbell. All Rights Reserved.