Anime Review: Case Closed Episode 127

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After a good a start, it seems like things are coming to a close.

Back in January, I started covering the remaining episodes from the fifth season, since I finished out 2013 by covering a few episodes.

So far, I have been good about posting consistently and have now reached the final four episodes, which I plan to cover quicker than I normally do.

Today, I will be reviewing Case Closed episode 127 (Detective Conan episode 120).

As I have given a series synopsis in an earlier post, I will not go over it again.

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Jimmy, Richard, and Rachel have invited to check out a resort that will be opening some time in the future.

However, their relaxing stay is ruined when the owner is seen falling to her death.

Everyone thinks that it was an accident, but Jimmy has his doubts.

Now, Jimmy must find out not only who killed the victim but also how.

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I am not too sure about this case. It was set up was somewhat well and, except for the culprit and some of his actions prior to the victim's death, not a whole lot was obvious. This is at least a step in the right direction, though it is not too far off from becoming just as bad as episode 6 was. There was at least one funny scene. The thing that I like the most though was that the next episode preview was correct yet again. As most of you guys know by now, Japan has been doing a terrible job with its next episode previews in their fifth season, which comprises the last 17 (18, according to FUNimation’s count) of FUNimation’s fifth season, and by now, I am not surprised about this. In the Japanese version, which I had to look up the fansubs for because I do not think that I can trust FUNimation’s Japanese track, the next episode preview says that the next episode is The Disappearing Weather Girl, which is the last episode dubbed by FUNimation. However, according to Detective Conan World’s episode list, MagicBox’s episode list, and my episode list, the next episode is actually The Forgotten Bond (Part 1), which is the last case that was adapted from the manga dubbed by FUNimation. In FUNimation’s version, the next episode preview says that that really is the next episode. Outside of that, I cannot really think of much else that I particularly liked. With not a whole lot to like, things are not off to good start already.

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Wow, considering that there was not a whole lot to like about this case, it looks like there are some major issues with this case. While I do not like everything I come across, I cannot say that there is a whole lot where I can think of only a few things, if any, that I liked. After all, listing the good does give me less reason to say outright that something was a complete waste of time. However, here, I had a hard time thinking of anything that I liked, which was why I practically skipped right to the very thing that I did like in this review. The case, while it was set up somewhat well and not too must was obvious, was still rather dull. Seeing as this is a filler case, according to Detective Conan World, the only ones to blame for this are the Japanese. I thought the Japanese learned their lesson already. As I have said on this blog many times, people want cases that are interesting, not some snooze fest. Besides, none of the famous detectives in detective fiction, such as Sherlock and Hercule Poirot, would have garnered any fans if too many of their cases were dull. If I had to point out what made this case awful, was what the culprit did before the victim died, thereby, making his guilt obvious. When Jimmy and the mayor come across the culprit, he is found to be on the phone and he is trying to put string back in his pocket rather quickly. Moments later, we see the victim fall to her death. I am not sure about anyone else, but for me, this enough to make him guilty. I know, I should not be making assumptions with very little information, but the other characters that Detective Conan World’s page lists as suspects in this case did not seem to leave the side of any of our main trio, though they could have off screen. As a result, there really is only one suspect in this case. Honestly, I do not know how people can think of this as a whodunit case, when there is only one suspect. I thought that whodunits required more than one suspect. Not only is there only one suspect, but we are also not even trying to crack an alibi or seeing if the main cast can figure out how the culprit committed the crime. Has Japan really forgotten how to create a decent case that only has one suspect? They were able to do a good one back in episode 36 (Japanese count), so I do not see why they cannot do it again here. If there is only one suspect, we must know how they did and wait see if the characters can figure it out or try and figure out how to break that suspect’s alibi. With 120 episodes under their belt at this point, they should know this much by now, yet they drop the ball here. Unfortunately, with the way it is right now, I had absolutely no desire to try and solve this case. It looks like episode 6 is no longer the worst episode of the series, though it is still the worst in how much was obvious. Another thing that hurt this case, though it usually does not affect things too much, is that the issues from the fourth season set still exist. While the continuing issues from the fourth season set may not be bad, the dull case and the fact that the case was not handled how a case with only one suspect should be, nor was it an actual whodunit, damaged this case beyond repair.

In light of the fact that the bad far outweighed any good that may have been present, this case was a complete waste of time. I recommend everyone, no matter whether they are a newcomer to Detective Conan (Case Closed) or not, to avoid this case at all costs.

What are your thoughts on Case Closed episode 127? Do you agree or disagree with my views? Do you have anything to add? Feel free to comment.

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Copyright © 2015 Bryce Campbell. All Rights Reserved.