Anime Review: Case Closed Episodes 28 & 29

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Are any of you guys excited for tomorrow? I kind of am, since I may be getting some new books, but nobody knows for sure. Anyway, since this is the Christmas season and Un-Go has finally ended, even though I do not know if I get the prequel episode or not, I decided to continue watching Detective Conan (Case Closed). I plan to be covering it regularly again in 2013, along with Inuyasha: The Final Act episodes 14-26, unless Viz decides to release them at an earlier time, since Rightstuf lists those for a 2013 release. Today, I will be reviewing Case Closed episodes 28 & 29 (Detective Conan episodes 27 & 28).

As I have given a series synopsis in an earlier post, I will not go over it again.

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It is just another ordinary, or so Jimmy, Richard, and Rachel think. They do get a bit of excitement though as a robber runs past them, while they discuss Richard's upcoming reunion with some college buddies. Later, because of the fact that Jimmy saved Richard, Rachel and Jimmy end up traveling with Richard after all, but it is not as relaxing as everyone there thinks it will. After coming back from a fireworks show, they find a member of their party dead. Everyone thought it was suicide, but Jimmy thinks otherwise. Now, Jimmy and the gang must find out what really happened.

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I really enjoyed these episodes. After having dealt with one of the worst entries in the detective, mystery, and crime genres, I am certainly glad to come back to something at least decent. The case was certainly set up very well and one that I have not come across before I watched this show. Yes, what happens in the episodes is not exactly new for fans of detective, mystery, and crime, but I cannot really remember anything with the kind of trick involved here. I cannot say that there was not anything that was too obvious. On other hand, things were not as obvious as episode 6, which is certainly a good thing about this series. After all, things are much easier to follow in Detective Conan (Case Closed) than they are in Un-Go. There were a few funny things that made an appearance as well that gave me a bit of a chuckle, one of which turns in to something really important down the line in the anime counterpart of some cases that happen in volume 14 of the manga. The best thing about the case here, as well as the episodes themselves, was that Richard did not seem to be as dense as usual. After being told that it was a murder case and not a suicide, Richard suspected that one of his friends killed another friend and tells Jimmy as much. For somebody that continually makes wrong deductions when there is more than one suspect, with the exception of episode 21 (Japanese count), where his problem was second-guessing, Richard sure did not overlook the obvious, which is usually Jimmy's role. At the same time, I will say that Richard is definitely not as observant as Jimmy, since he did not notice anything weird about the gunshot wound in his friend's head. Speaking of Jimmy, he even knew the only possible suspects for quite a while. Got to say, he has not lost his touch yet, which is certainly a good thing, considering that he is a teen genius and detective. After all, who would want a protagonist that is not some kind of genius, unless the story or series is meant to be all humor? Another good thing about this case was that it was pretty faithful, unlike episode 10, according to MagicBox, to its manga counterpart, which is featured in volume 9. Although there are some nice cases in the anime, the best ones all have manga counterparts, in my opinion. In fact, I have rarely, if ever, encountered a fan of Detective Conan (Case Closed) that said their favorite case was not something that only happened in the anime. For example, Professor C, of the Save Case Closed movement, posted on the SCC forum that one of his favorite episodes was 219 (Japanese count), which occurs in volume 30 according to Viz Media. Gosho Aoyama does not always create good cases, but I just find things are more enjoyable when something is faithful to the source material. Outside of that, I cannot really think of much else good to say, especially without repeating myself. The fact that the case was setup well and things were easy to follow, compared to Un-Go, as well as the fact that a trick I have not encountered before this series is used and the fact that it is fairly faithful to the manga counterpart sure makes this interesting.

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Although I liked the case and episodes, there were certainly some problems. First, when Rachel says that she went to the hot springs and was wearing a swimsuit, when shown otherwise. In the manga counterpart, however, Rachel does not even say she was wearing a swimsuit. Now, I have not seen the Adult Swim version of this episode in quite some time, but this is like episode 14 (Japanese count). Yet again, FUNimation chooses not to redub the episode to fit better with the Japanese footage, which can be a huge mistake in a few instances where the footage and the audio must match in order to find the clues and such. However, unlike episode 14 (Japanese count), where the footage was important, this is no big deal, so I will just mark this as an annoyance, especially since I got these episodes before FUNimation started doing their season sets, which is why my wiki's episode list, in case anyone ever found it, has seven seasons listed instead of five. To those that have not seen this before, this may come across as a dub error, which I doubt is the case, unless either somebody has screenshots from the Adult Swim broadcast or MagicBox continues doing episode comparisons. My biggest issue here was that the culprit was obvious. Yes, I know that I complained about the culprit not being obvious in Un-Go episode 11, but I also said that it is usually a good thing that the culprit is not obvious. When Richard and his friends find the corpse, one of Richard's friend states that the area is a crime scene and not to touch the body before they even got to verify whether or not the victim truly was dead. Now, there are certainly situations in which a person would know immediately that somebody is dead without having examined the body, such as a victim of decapitation, but the case involves gunshot wounds, so people should not really be that certain that a person is dead. Police in real life know that there are details about a crime that only the perpetrator would know and most fans of detective, mystery, and, crime fiction should also be aware of such facts. You have to probably be even denser than Richard to not recognize this fact. What else makes things bad about this is that like most cases in this series, this was not setup with dramatic irony. Episode 9 was great because of the dramatic irony setup, but the obvious just does not always make things that enjoyable. Since this is also an issue in manga counterpart of this case, the blame falls squarely on Gosho. Considering that most of the time criminals do place a target on themselves in real life and not many people notice the obvious all the time though, I am willing to just label this as a minor issue, especially since this is something newcomers to crime fiction should be aware of. While The presence of only minor issues and annoyances does create some negatives, they certainly do not outweigh the positives.

Despite the fact that FUNimation still does not redub episodes to fit with the Japanese, as well as the fact that the culprit was obvious, this case was definitely worth watching. Unless one knows everything about rigor mortis, I would recommend this to fans of detective, mystery, and crime. As for fans of Detective Conan (Case Closed), I would certainly recommend watching this. As for everyone else, I think that this is a good introduction to the series, as well as the detective, mystery, and crime fiction genres.

What are your thoughts on Case Closed episodes 28 & 29? Do you agree or disagree with my views? Do you have anything to add? Feel free to comment.

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Copyright © 2015 Bryce Campbell. All Rights Reserved.