Anime Review: Case Closed Season 5

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Having covered all 123 (130, according to FUNimation’s count) episodes that FUNimation has dubbed, I guess it is time to end my coverage of the anime and focus only on the manga.

However, before I do, I will be doing one more review.

Today, I will be reviewing Case Closed season 5.

As I have given a series synopsis in an earlier post, I will not go over it again.

Cases


Like my other season reviews, here is a list of cases featured in this season. They are order by when they occur in the manga and volume, according to Detective Conan World, so no filler cases are included.

Review


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I kind of liked this season. Unlike its predecessor, most of the cases were quite good, with one that had a scene that gave off powerful emotion. It looks like Japan made some good choices when it came to what cases to put in as episodes 100-123. All nine cases, except for episode 113 (Japanese count), which I cannot verify because the volume that contains it is not available in my country, were pretty faithful to their manga counterparts, with only one obvious, but understandable, omission between the anime adaption and manga counterpart. I also liked how I got quite a bit of a laugh out this season. It has been quite some time since I have been able to laugh about something that happened during case. However, the thing that I liked the most was that FUNimation consistently fixed some minor problems that happen in Japan’s fifth season, which is comprised of the final 17 (18, according to FUNimation’s count) episodes of this set and then some. Many times, the Japanese version featured next episode previews for cases that either already happened or are quite a bit further down the line and FUNimation replaced those previews with the ones that are the real next episodes. This alone makes me glad that I watch the dubbed version of Detective Conan, instead of the subbed version. Outside of that, I cannot really think of anything else without repeating myself. The fact that most of the cases were actually decent and that I found something truly funny, as well as the fact that FUNimation fixed minor issues present in the original Japanese version, made this season fairly enjoyable.

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Although there I things that I liked about this season, there are some issues. First, many of the issues from the fourth season set, such as the removal of the Next Conan’s Hint segments, have returned. The worst of which was the fact that FUNimation once again split an extended length episode into multiple episodes, the victim this time being episode 118 (Japanese count). As I said in my review of that case, I was hoping that they would not do that again, after I had complained about it in my original review of the fourth season on Amazon, but they did not listen at all. As a result, I lost any desire to repurchase any episodes I would have been willing to buy again and the desire to cover episodes 124+ (Japanese count) is barely existent. Another thing that I found wrong with this set, which again involves episode 118 (Japanese count), is that they removed a scene that was present in the Japanese version and the manga. While I may have been willing to overlook this omission, I cannot because of a far worse issue that I will bring up later. I also did not like how FUNimation’s dub did not make any sense in a few places, whether it be because of a mismatched dub, like episode 123 (Japanese count), or their dub did not explain things that were explained in both the Japanese version and the manga. As FUNimation is supposed to be a professional dubbing company, I expect them to not do things like this. The thing that annoyed me the most about this set though was like its predecessor, the box says that this season set was unedited and uncut. Really? As I said before in my review of the fourth season, if the box says that it is unedited and uncut, I expect it to be unedited and uncut. However, with how much was done in this season set, it obviously does not deserve to be advertised as unedited and uncut. Fortunately, the Viridian edition, SAVE edition (see links that come before the cases section), and the iTunes edition do not have that false advertising, so many issues of the issues I have this set are not quite as bothersome in the newer releases, though the fact that the two episodes that made up episode 118 (Japanese count), like episode 96 (Japanese count), was never combined still bugs me. While there are issues that can normally be overlooked, the fact that this set was advertised as being unedited and uncut, which made most them issues to begin with, really ruined my enjoyment of this season.

Considering that there were things some things to like, this is definitely worth watching. I recommend this to fans of detective, mystery, and crime fiction, as well as fans of Detective Conan (Case Closed), but only if you get the newer editions, which are not advertised as being unedited and uncut. As for everyone else, since this is the last season set from FUNimation, at least until they decide to release episodes 124+ (Japanese count), I recommend getting one of the other season sets first.

Farewell


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With this, I bid the anime fans of Detective Conan (Case Closed) farewell.

If you guys want me to cover episodes 124+ (Japanese count), I suggest you go buy what is currently out now from FUNimation and pester them until they decide to release more season sets (bonus points for making them go DRM-free digital downloads).

Otherwise, I will only be covering the manga, which will most likely be the first place to reveal the boss of Black Org, since Bourbon and Haibara both debuted in the manga before the anime.

What are your thoughts on Case Closed season 5? Were you as disappointed as I was about the continued false advertising or were you lucky enough to only get this season’s later editions? Was there something that you were annoyed by that I did not mention here or in the episode reviews? Feel free to comment.

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Copyright © 2015 Bryce Campbell. All Rights Reserved.