Book Review: Cage of Eden Volume 14

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After the long and unusual wait, mainly due to what patterns have been in the past, the last book in my order, which I first mentioned in back in April and was the first time I received books in the month of release via online orders, has finally arrived.

Today, I will be reviewing that title, which is called Cage of Eden Volume 14 by Yoshinobu Yamada.

As I have given a series synopsis in an earlier post, I will not go over it again.

After a long trek through the jungle, the party Akira assembled has finally reached the pyramid where a doctor is supposedly the leader of the group that claimed it as their territory.

However, when the rumors about the doctor turn out to be true, Akira and his friends are forced to explore the pyramid, where they receive more questions than answers about the island itself.

Meanwhile, Yarai, who originally wanted to meet back up with Akira’s group, in order to find out what was on the hard drive his group found in the lighthouse, decides to head for the pyramid as well, because one of his comrades had collapsed with abdominal pain, despite the bad feeling Yarai had about going there.

Even though it has been quite some time since I read these chapters, especially because this series ended at volume 21, which was one of the two guesses about the final volume I made in my review of volume 8 and was released in Japan in February of last year, according to Amazon’s Japanese site, I enjoyed the book. I really liked how Akira and his party decided to scout out the group residing at the pyramid. It seemed that Akira and his party improved because of their experiences of past, since they did not really look into things when they came across fellow students that were trying to create a school back in volume 5. Then again, Akira and his gang were not aware of what kind of tyranny was in the works for the school that they thought would bring so much joy until something happened to the fake Miina, whose real name was not mentioned until the final chapter, as far as I can remember, whereas this time Akira’s group have heard about the terrible things done by the supposed doctor that both Yarai and Akira wanted to see. As such, it is not that impressive of a decision to me. After all, I would want to investigate people if I hear bad things about them, which I am sure that many others would as well, though there will those that take those rumors as fact, just like there are those that automatically assume a person on trial is guilty of the crimes charged against him or her. However, I think it it is best to investigate people regardless of whether there are bad rumors or not, especially in situations where survival is important. I also liked how the doctor saw through Akira. With as much as he does know about the human body, such as pulse rates and exploiting specific places on the human body, like the Brachial Plexus and the Celiac Plexus. Of course, I doubt that one could pick out any doctor and have them pinpoint those exactly, since doctors these days specialize in certain things. I also liked how Yarai changed his mind about meeting up with Akira’s main group, which is now led by Mariya. It showed even further that he really does care about his companions, though his teacher is one he worries about more than others. After all, if he was really as troublesome as many people thought him to be right up until Akira and friends ended up on the island, he would have abandoned the teacher when she was experiencing great pain, as well as his other companions, but he never did that. However, what made me really like it was that he changed his mind, despite have bad feelings about what may happen when he meets the doctor that we, the audience, already learned was as evil as rumors said. After all, he has shown that he does care about he his and in a survival situation like the people are in on the island, we cannot really choose who can help us, since even people that tried to hurt us or those we care about may be the only ones that can provide that help, like the cave incident in volume 5. The thing that caught my interest the most though was when Akira’s party ventured into the pyramid they saw shapes of animals that they had encountered before and even food that they regularly eat in dark rooms. This makes me think that maybe the whole island itself is man-made, not just the mountain that Yarai noted was man-made and the four towers depicted in the map Yarai found back at the lighthouse. If that is the case, which I will not say whether it is or not because I know how this will end, then I wonder what exactly the reason was that the island was created for. Outside of that, there were some funny parts but nothing else really jumped out to me. The fact that Akira’s party finally does some scouting of a group they have heard about, instead of blindly trusting the doctor, and that Yarai was willing to head somewhere that gave him a bad feeling just to help one of his group members instead of doing what he wanted, as well as the fact that there are already signs suggesting that the island is man-made, made this an interesting read.

Although I did like the book, there are some issues. However, aside from gripe that probably will not be relevant until the last volume is published, nothing really seemed to bug me. As a result, I will have to say that there is nothing worth mentioning.

Considering that many questions arise, such as if the island was man-made and why, this was definitely worth reading. I recommend this to fans of survival stories, as well as Cage of Eden. As for everyone else, this series may be worth giving a shot, but like I said in my review of the previous volume, one may be confused if he or she has not read the earlier volumes.

What are your thoughts on Cage of Eden Volume 14? Did you enjoy it or were you disappointed? Was there something that you liked that or did not like I forgot to mention? Feel free to comment.

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Copyright © 2015 Bryce Campbell. All Rights Reserved.