Book Review: Cage of Eden Volume 15

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Well, it looks like I am doing much better on covering this recent set of books than the ones from July, though those were not among the titles I regularly follow, unlike the bulk of this set.

Before I had finished covering the eight volumes of D.N.Angel, I had gotten three books from Barnes & Noble. So far, one of those three have been covered and only two remain.

Today, I will be reviewing one of those two titles, which is called Cage of Eden Volume 15 by Yoshinobu Yamada.

As I have given a series synopsis in an earlier post, I will not go over it again.

Having been taken captive by Nishikiori, Ohmori meets up with one of the teachers of Akira’s school, but they have little time to relax when they find out that the evil doctor and his group will execute them.

Meanwhile, Akira and his friends continue exploring the pyramid and find that more than just a few structures found on the island were man made.

I enjoyed this volume. The whole mystery behind the island just became much more interesting. Not only were the towers and the mountain that both Yarai’s and Akira’s groups passed through man made, but much of the life itself present there was also the result of man kind. Now, this may not be something entirely new, mainly because many people would think of Jurassic Park from reading this book, and the translation notes in it say that there are actual attempts to do this kind of thing, but with so many animals from different time periods being present, this kind of thing actually makes sense. However, even though I know the answer already, I am wondering why the island exists and if the whole island is man made, what is it actually called. This is exactly what I want to see in a work. After all, I doubt anything would be that enjoyable if rereading a story could not bring up the same questions that one got from the first time they read it. I also liked how the members of Nishikiori’s group acted when Akira’s group got out of the pyramid and revealed their intentions to free the people from the doctor’s tyranny. While it is nice to see Akira’s group succeed in a world where survival depends on the choices, they do need to face some failure too. In this case, the failure is not being able to understand what life is like under a tyrannical ruler, or even be a victim of abuse or other torment. Even though many people, including myself, have not faced these kinds of harsh realities like the generation of my grandparents, who lived during World War II, and those before them did, may be able see what a person should do, but we do not understand what is going through the mind of an individual going through the things that the people following Nishikiori. Likewise, Akira did not understand they Nishikiori’s followers would not go with Akira’s party because fear kept them loyal, and this volume did a good job of illustrating that, though we do not know about all of his atrocities other than using his medical knowledge to control people. Speaking of controlling people, it seems Miina was making plans of his own by convincing three guys to rescue Ohmori. Of course, seeing that he was able to run his own group back in volumes 3 and 4, where Akira first met him, so it makes sense that he can make people do his bidding for him. Still, that does not mean that Miina does not care about his comrades that he accompanied to the pyramid. There were also some funny scenes present. The funniest happened while Miina used his appearance to convince people to help him. While talking with the men, Miina thinks to himself that he can make allies because a lolita complex is the most common fetish in the world, and those that control individuals with such a fetish would rule the world. I am not too sure about you guys, but it made me laugh because kids do not usually think like that, nor do they intend to take over the world. Then again, being in an environment as dangerous as the one that Akira’s whole group, not just the party he formed to visit the pyramid, is currently does not really let kids be kids. The thing that caught my interest the most though was what Akira’s teacher had up his sleeve. When the men that Miina convinced came to rescue him and Ohmori, all he did was rummage around for some stuff that he hid, then had the trio return him and Ohmori back to their cell. Normally, a person would take the opportunity to escape, and while I think that his worry for Akira was fine, it probably would have been best for them to head out and formulate a plan to come to the aid of Akira’s exploration party, especially considering that Akira got out of some tight spots when Ohmori was burden. There must be something going on in the teacher’s mind, since he talked about things that are associated with explosives. Unfortunately, because this series ended quite some time ago now, I do not remember exactly if the plan was bigger than just escaping. Outside of those things, nothing much else caught my attention. The fact that mystery of the island is getting more mysterious and that one of Akira’s teacher may have something his sleeve, as well as the fact that it was funny seeing Miina get allies to help him, made this book pretty decent.

Although I did like the book, there are some issues. Fortunately, I cannot think of anything that really annoyed me. As a result, I will have to say that there is nothing worth mentioning.

Considering that the mystery of the island got more interesting and there were quite a few other things to like, this was definitely worth reading. I recommend this to fans of survival stories, as well as fans of Cage of Eden. As for everyone else, this may be worth giving a shot, but it might be better to read the other volumes first, though it is not as important to do so at this point as it is for Pandora Hearts.

What are your thoughts on Cage of Eden Volume 21? Did you enjoy this volume as much as I did or did you hate it? Was there anything you liked or hated that went unmentioned? Feel free to comment.

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Copyright © 2015 Bryce Campbell. All Rights Reserved.