Book Review: Cage of Eden Volume 6

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Like I said last post, I recently got three books from Barnes & Noble, as well as four more that are to be shipped. Today, I am going to review another of those purchases, which is called Cage of Eden Volume 6 by Yoshinobu Yamada.

As I gave a series synopsis in an earlier post, I will not go over it again.

Akira has been knocked for a while. He does not know for how long, until he remembers why he is there. He was supposed to help a group of college students get their stuff back from a pack of wolves and even get out of the situation that Akira and his group are in. However, things worse when one of the college students tries to seduce him. Later, when Akira and his group return to base, where everyone from the last volume awaits them, everyone thinks that things are peaceful. However, terror is placed in their hearts when a beast comes attacking from the sky and one of the new members of Akira's group notices that things are similar to an event that already happened. Now, Akira and the gang must find a way to ward off the beast before they are killed by either mass hysteria or by the beast themselves.

Even though it has been a while since I read these chapters, I enjoyed the volume. Akira and the gang seem to be perceptive when they are are tangled up in the situation involving the wolves. However, it seems weird that the wolves would help humans. Of course, that could be due to our preconceived that animals would just attack us on spot and/or out of nowhere. The truth of the matter for many animals though, such as snakes, is that they will not attack unless provoked. Yes, the provocation may be something very insignificant, but animals do not see it that way because they are as afraid of us as we are of them. It would be like if somebody started running towards a person with a knife. If a person had a gun, they would have the advantage of distance, if the assailant did not know how to throw the said knife or the weaknesses of the gun, but that is what something as simple as a single step seems like to animals. I certainly thought the wolves were going to kill them. I also liked how the leader of the wolf pack took a hint from Akira and attacked the other beast that was present in the same location. I guess that is the reason that Akira survived, since the wolf felt indebted to him, but only Yamada would know the answer to that one, since he wrote this series. There were also scenes that were extremely funny. For example, Rei, one of the college students that asked Akira for help, decided to take a bath with Mina, thinking that she was a girl, but then ran out shocked that Mina had something found only on males. It is funny because supposedly children of either sex bathes with somebody in Japan. At least, that is the gist I get since many anime and manga portray that. Second, we know by now that Mina is a boy, even though he dresses like a girl. Kind of funny that nobody told her that fact, considering that almost everyone in Akira's group knew after the school incident that occurred last volume, because they absorbed the group into their own numbers. Another funny thing was that when everyone grouped up to do lookout duty, a girl called Mariya Mari chan. For those that do not know, the honorific of chan is used for animals, little kids of both sexes, and girls, at least according to the translation notes at the end of the book. What is so funny about that is that except for his physique nothing about him fits any of those categories. The way that Mariya reacts is also funny. However, the best part happened during the wolf incident. Worried about Rion, Akira rushes to see if she is okay and some time after Suzuki told he that she was okay, Akira rescues her from attempted rape, calling her his girl. We know that Akira and Rion are childhood friends and that was pretty nice of him to come in and rescue her. This something that I would be expecting an elder brother or father to do, but considering that none of her family was stranded in the crash landing, Akira is pretty much the closest thing she has to family. It just shows that no matter situation his friends are in, Akira really cares about his friends. Sadly, the same thing cannot be said about many of the men in today's society. There are men out there that will do or say anything in order to get what they want from a woman. We generally call these types of people womanizers, players, and such. On the Other hand, this kind of behavior does not exist in only men. After all, greed is a universal sin. Women will also do or say anything, even playing upon a person's emotion, to get men to do what they want. Those out for the same purpose as a womanizer gets their own set of labels too. Suzuki definitely fit that profile and many people thought he would die, due to a pattern that has been occurring for a while at this point in the series. Outside of the content, things have been done pretty well. Unlike Negima! Volume 34, the Table of Contents is done appropriately, so at least there seems to be consistency in this batch of releases. Also, unlike Bloody Monday Volume 3, we are told that the preview in Japanese, which is certainly a plus.

Although I enjoyed the volume, there is a problem. There is no honorific definition list. This is pretty much a minor issue for the series, but considering that not everyone reads Negima! as their first manga, I think that this should be present in all series. Maybe, Kodansha thinks that only those that have the knowledge of Japanese and/or experience with other manga or anime series or even already read the online scans buy this series. However, considering that this is just a minor issue, it is not bad enough that it takes down the quality of the release.

Since the issues are just minor, I can say that this was definitely a good read. I would recommend this to fans of survival stories. As for everyone else, the translations are still not for newcomers to anime and/or manga, but it is certainly worth a shot.

What are your thoughts on Cage of Eden Volume 6? Do you agree or disagree with my views? Do you have anything to add? Feel free to comment.

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Copyright © 2015 Bryce Campbell. All Rights Reserved.