Book Review: Case Closed Volume 43

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Now that I caught up to the English translation of the Detective Conan (Case Closed) manga, the manga series will now be covered as I get volumes, just like Cage of Eden, Bloody Monday, and Negima!. Speaking of which, I already reviewed two books from my recent order, leaving only one left, which is a recent release. Today, I am going to review that book, which is called Case Closed Volume 43 by Gosho Aoyama.

As I have given a series synopsis in an earlier post, I will not go over it again.

Jimmy and the Junior Detective League are still on the hunt for the one people call The Slasher with the help of Detective Sato and Takagi. During the investigation, even though George had forgotten to mention something, the gang is led to a new clue appears that turns up three suspects that all have the same make and model of cars. The Junior Detective League, as well as Sato and Takagi, believe that Amy could pick him out, but Jimmy and Haibara agree that there is too much risk in letting the suspects see Amy. Now, they must weed out the culprit before he can get away. Later, with too much free time on his hands, Richard goes to Poirot with Jimmy where Richard is asked to find the owner of a phone that was left behind. However, when Yumi shows up asking about the same man Jimmy and Richard are to find, they find out he died, leaving a new mystery to solve. Some time after that case is resolved, Harley and Kazuha have come from Osaka asking if they wanted to go see some more stuff around the area of Osaka, but Kazuha and Harley do not seem like they on exactly what they are going to do. When Kazuha says that it is not possible to do both, Richard decides to have a deduction showdown to decide what they did. The case where the showdown will take place is a murder case that Meguire wanted help with, and the police have rounded up the four suspects who found the body. Now, they must decipher the clues and determine if the culprit is one of the four. Afterwards, the gang all head to Koshien, thinking that they would finally have a peaceful day. However, when Harley answers a cell phone that was found on their rows, a guy threatens to kill himself and take the people watching the Koshien in the stadium with him, if he is not found before the game ends. Now, Jimmy and Harley, as well as a police inspector, must find the person and make sure nothing happens at one of the nation's biggest events.

Unlike volume 40, which I read not long after a Black Org related incident, I enjoyed this volume. It may be because it has been a while since I read the previous volume. After all, I did say in my review for volume 40 that things are not really same after a Black Org event or case. I liked how most of the cases here had an actual order to them. Normally, each of the cases is episodic, which was why I went through each of the cases individually for volumes 27 through 41, minus the three volumes that I suspect went out-of-print. After all, if we were to compare the length of this series as well as the fact that nobody ages, I can only compare it to being The Simpsons of the detective, mystery, and crime fiction genres. Besides, no other show comes to my mind that has hundreds of episodes, exceeding 500 episodes. However, here we get references to cases that happened earlier in the volume, which does seem to set up some sort of timeline. Also, the only things that have a definite timeline is the fact that Black Org incidents are recalled in cases, no matter if the current case is Black Org related or not. At first, I thought Harley was a jerk in this volume, but I really liked how he remembered what Jimmy told him in the diplomat murder case, which was the last case to air on Adult Swim's broadcast of the anime version of this series, when he saw how down Kazuha was getting. Of course, I am sure that I would not be the only one thinking that Harley was a jerk if that were the case. I also really liked how the Koshien case started. I had as much excitement here as probably any Black Org or KID case. Then again, Gosho does seem to have a liking for baseball, since he has a manga that focuses on baseball, called 3rd Base Fourth, and a short that was probably its prototype, according to Detective Conan World, which is called Excalibur. I think that I am feeling this excitement because of that possibly, but I am not as certain as my guess that the author of The Baseball Box Prophecy is affiliated with the LDS church. There was not really any case I did not like. Another thing that was in this volume's favor was that not a whole lot of cases had too much obvious, which is definitely a good thing about for fans of the detective, mystery, and crime genres. That fact that most cases have a timeline within the volume, which is quite uncommon outside of Black Org cases or events, and that no case is uninteresting or too obvious certainly make this volume look great.

Although I liked the volume, it is not perfect. However, only one thing is really noticeable. In my review for volume 36, I made mention of a possible consistency issue and that same issue appears in this volume. As it is the same issue, I have nothing further to say than what I said in my review for volume 36. Also, at first, I thought I had something to complain about, but it looks like it is more a problem on Japan's end than the US end. Since it did not affect anything yet, I will just say that it is nonissue. Since the main thing that came to my mind is that a possible consistency issue occurs again, this does take down the quality of the release a bit, but not a whole lot to make it as bad as Negima! Volume 34.

Despite the fact that a possible consistency issue happened again, the fact that none of the cases were uninteresting or too obvious certainly made this volume worth reading. I recommend this to fans of Detective Conan (Case Closed), as well as fans of detective, mystery, and crime fiction. As for everyone else, this is a nice introduction to the series and the detective, mystery, and crime genres.

What are your thoughts on Case Closed Volume 43? Do you agree or disagree with my views? Do you have anything to add? Feel free to comment.

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Copyright © 2015 Bryce Campbell. All Rights Reserved.