Book Review: Rurouni Kenshin Volume 25

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It looks like things are going pretty well, huh?

Before my recent Barnes & Noble purchase, I was covering some titles in my backlog and dealt with all but four of the books than I had planned to cover.

Now, with the recent purchases out of the way, it is time to continue on with the backlog.

Today, I will be covering one of those titles, which is called Rurouni Kenshin Volume 25 by Nobuhiro Watsuki.

As I have given a series synopsis in an earlier post, I will not go over it again.

Chaos erupts in town, as one of EnishiÔÇÖs comrades breaks out of jail and goes on a rampage.

With everyone busy with other things, such as a struggle to find the answer to their inner turmoil, only Yahiko is around to deal with the threat.

However, against a foe that has lost all sanity, Yahiko may be in for the struggle of his life. I kind of liked this book.

While not a whole lot happened, outside of two major events, I did not feel like putting down this book at all. Now, I have read and watched quite a few series where nothing interesting happens for quite a while, but I do not particularly remember them being as exciting or satisfying as this.

Even Pandora Hearts had a lot going on right up until the final chapters, which I am expecting to arrive where I live sometime next month, had quite a bit going for it with its numerous struggles.

Here, however, the only struggles to be seen were KenshinÔÇÖs continued inner conflict and Yahiko standing up to Kujiranami.

I might be willing to stand up to Kujiranami too, if I were in YahikoÔÇÖs shoes, but I definitely would not solo it or even try to get frightened police to help me like Yahiko did, since I do have a few things to watch out for if I do engage in physical combat.

As such, I have to really applaud Yahiko for doing something that I doubt many in our society would do, at least if it does not affect anyone important, like a friend or family member.

Of course, since the whole fight took up practically the entire book, I have to give Nobuhiro a ton of praise. Yes, he had been working on this series for five years when these chapters were new, since Rurouni Kenshin first came out in 1994 and these chapters came out in 1999, according to text of the book itself, and I expect nothing less from Nobuhiro.

After all, after five years, a writer has pretty much got to know how to do things properly in their speciality. I also liked how Kenshin got back on his feet after hearing TsubameÔÇÖs pleas and talking to the old man that regularly visits the place Kenshin fled to.

Many people slip up bad enough or blame themselves for something bad that had happened in their lives and they get down on themselves.

When these moments are portrayed in fiction, mainly in live action television shows and movies, they are done in a way that I cannot really feel too much for the characters, because I did not see what they went through to get to that point in time.

These troubles are what can lead people to give up on life, even right up to the point where they commit suicide or refuse to eat, despite the fact that they are otherwise healthy, and being able to understand the person and their situation is what helps to find the solution, though I would really recommend finding a professional if you know somebody going through this, instead of trying to handle things yourself.

Here, however, it is clear that Kenshin still feels terrible for not saving Kaoru and wants to throw everything away, yet does not, as the geezer that talks to him points out, and needs some sort of push.

Once he gets back in action, I felt like the series took a jump to a whole other level, though it is kind of expected because Kenshin is supposed to have one more fight with Enishi.

Seeing of all this, I have to give Nobuhiro even more praise, because KenshinÔÇÖs depression and recovery seemed to be very believable, at least if one has been following the Jinchu arc since it began.

The thing that caught my interest the most though is the geezer himself.

There are so many mysteries surrounding him, like how he knew about KenshinÔÇÖs resolve to never kill again and his past.

Yes, he does suggest that he is EnishiÔÇÖs father because he said that his daughter was buried in Kyoto and KenshinÔÇÖs first wife was buried in Kyoto and it is revealed in thoughts that he knew Kenshin was her husband, but he has been missing from both EnishiÔÇÖs and TomoeÔÇÖs life for so long that he should not even possibly know what he knows about Kenshin.

Unfortunately, I do not think that this will ever be answered, so, like Nobuhiro, I will leave this for you guys to debate the answer, unless this was answered in the three remaining volumes in the series.

Still, it does create some kind of incentive to continue on with series, other than the fact that Kenshin is back to his old self again.

Outside of those things, I cannot really think of anything else that I particularly liked, at least without spoiling too much.

The fact that the book was exciting, even when there was not much going on, aside from KenshinÔÇÖs internal conflict and YahikoÔÇÖs fight with Kujiranami, and that there are mysteries surrounding the old man that Kenshin talked to made this volume fairly enjoyable.

Although I liked the book, there are some issues.

However, aside from some things that are too minor to talk about, such as typos, nothing really seemed to bug me too much.

As a result, I will have to say that there is nothing worth mentioning.

Considering that this volume was pretty good, even though not a whole lot happened, this was definitely worth reading.

I only recommend this to fans of Rurouni Kenshin, because the things that happen in this volume set the stage for what will happen in the final three volumes of the series.

What are your thoughts on Rurouni Kenshin Volume 25? Did you like it or hate it? Was there something you liked or hated that went unmentioned? Feel free to comment.

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Copyright © 2015 Bryce Campbell. All Rights Reserved.